Let’s Be Frank – New York Pops

 

A richly satisfying tribute to an icon of the American entertainment world.

 (Photos below: Magda Katz)

Tony DeSare

Tony DeSare

Frankie Moreno

Frankie Moreno

Storm Large

Storm Large

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan Silverman

Ryan Silverman

Storm Large, Tony DeSare

Storm Large, Tony DeSare

The New York Pops, under the direction of the ebullient Steven Reineke, gathered all its impressive musical forces to honor “Ole Blue Eyes,” Frank Sinatra, on the centennial of his birth in beautiful downtown Hoboken, New Jersey.   Somehow Mr. Reineke, four brilliant singers and the orchestra turned Carnegie Hall into an intimate, smoky cabaret. The arrangements—many by Sinatra favorite, Nelson Riddle—were rich and stylish, evoking the great singer in many ways.

The program began and ended with two versions of the Kander & Ebb anthem “New York, New York,” the latter a joyous sing-along.

The four singers, all quite distinctive, took turns in solos and duets. Frankie Moreno, the glitzy Dean Martin-ish crooner took the stage with “It Had to Be You” (Isham Jones/Gus Kahn) and “That’s Life” (Dean Kay/Kelly Gordon) which channeled Elvis more than Sinatra. His “One for My Baby” (Arlen/Mercer), accompanied mostly by a tinkling piano, created a dark, sensuous mood.

(Photos Below: Maryann Lopinto)

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Cabaret favorite Tony DeSare wrapped his smooth, light baritone around Cole Porter’s “Night and Day” followed by a touching “My Funny Valentine” (Rodgers/Hart). His “I Have Dreamed” (Rodgers/Hammerstein) caught the longing of its lyrics.

Mr. DeSare was joined by the svelte, sultry Storm Large, whose tight gown and gloves brought to mind chanteuses of the past. They sang Johnny Mercer’s “Something’s Gotta Give” after which her jaunty “The Best Is Yet to Come” (Coleman/Leigh) showed her Rat Pack style while her “Come Rain or Come Shine” (Arlen/Mercer) was slow and ardent.

The final singer was Broadway’s Ryan Silverman who had ample opportunity to show how loose and sexy he can be, starting with a lustily romantic “Moonlight Become You” (VanHeusen/Burke) and a boisterous, winking “The Birth of the Blues” (Henderson/DeSylva/Brown) during which he was joined by Mr. Moreno who sauntered down the Carnegie Hall aisle, martini glass in hand, acting annoyed that Mr. Silverman started without him!

Messrs DeSare and Moreno showed another side of their talent with a four-handed piano rendition of “All of Me” (Gerald Marks/Seymour Simons). They competed, jumped up and down and even played upside down making it a highlight of the evening.

The lighter, nepotistic side of Sinatra was demonstrated with the silly, but charming, “Something Stupid,” originally sung by Sinatra with his daughter, Nancy, here by Ms. Large and Mr. Silverman who charmingly gave into its naughty innuendo.

Ms. Large put her powerful stamp on “My Way” (Claude François/Jacques Revaux/Paul Anka), perhaps Sinatra’s most iconic number. She was chillingly terrific, her voice rising to the farthest walls.

 

New York Pops Let’s Be Frank – April 10, 2015

Carnegie Hall  154 West 57th St., at Seventh Ave.  New York, NY

Tickets: Carnegie Charge – 212-247-7800 or www.carnegiehall.org

Information about upcoming events: www.newyorkpops.org

 

 

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