Theater-Film-Talk

Mayim Bialik Joins Liev Schreiber, Mandy Gonzalez, Adam Kantor & More for Holocaust Remembrance Day Reading – The Museum of Jewish Heritage will present “18 Voices: A Liberation Day Reading of Young Writers’ Diaries From The Holocaust” on Wednesday, January 27 at 8:00 PM – Register Visit: https://mjhnyc.org/events/18-voices-a-liberation-day-reading-of-young-writers-diaries-from-the-holocaust/ Tickets are free with a suggested donation.

Shakespeare Lovers Romeo and Juliet film from London’s National Theatre, with Jessie Buckley and Josh O”Connor, will air on PBS April 23 at 9 PM ET as part of its Great Performances series. The made-for-TV-movie is being presented in lieu of an in-person staging at the U.K. institution. Romeo and Juliet is directed by NT Associate Simon Godwin and adapted by Emily Burns. The London venue’s Lyttelton stage was turned into a film studio, making this the first time an original production for the screen was created at the National Theatre’s campus.

Joining Buckley and Josh O’Connor in the cast are Olivier winners Deborah Findlay and Tamsin Greig as the Nurse and Lady Capulet, respectively, Fisayo Akinade as Mercutio, Lucian Msamati as the Friar, Shubham Saraf as Benvolio, David Judge as Tybalt, Alex Mugnaioni as Paris, and Ellis Howard as Sampson. The adaptation is set in present-day Italy, where Catholic and secular values clash as two young lovers strive to transcend a world of violence and corruption.

During the month of February, Orfeh, Andy KarlMarti Gould Cummings, and Blake Allen will join Michael Kushner and Remy Germinario, on their live podcast My Broadway Memory, a talk show exclusively on the Broadway Podcast Network (BPN). Designed to keep Broadway alive. Cummings and Allen will join on February 4th at 7pm EST and Orfeh and Karl will join on February 18th at 7pm EST exclusively at BPN.fm/mybroadwaymemorylive.

Don’t miss: An Oral History of the Broadway Shutdown — Part 1″ by TheaterMania’s David Gordon – “As we hit the summer of 2020, I started documenting stories from across the Broadway community in an effort to make sense of it all. This is the first in a multi-part oral history of the Broadway industry shutdown, as told by the artists making theater eight times a week.”

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